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Tiger Stadium

Identification

Tiger Stadium
Navin Field, Briggs Stadium
217180

Map

Structure in General

stadium
demolished [destroyed]
exposed structure
applied masonry
early modernism

Usages

baseball

Facts

  • Home of Major League Baseball's Detroit Tigers from 1912-1999. The team moved to Comerica Park to begin the 2000 season.
  • Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick announced on June 16, 2006 that most of Tiger Stadium would be torn down for retail and upper-level lofts, but that part of the baseball diamond, and part of the stadium structure would be preserved for the redevelopment of the site.
  • Tiger Stadium was opened as Navin Field in 1912 at a cost of $300,000, and named after Frank Navin, the team owner. Navin Field's official capacity was 23,000.
  • In 1924, Navin Field's original stands were doubled-decked increasing the official capacity of the stadium to 30,000 seats. The team and stadium were bought in Walter Briggs in 1935, and expanded the next year to boost the capacity to 36,000 seats.
  • In 1948, Tiger Stadium became the last stadium in the American League to install lighting for the field.
  • The stadium was officially named Tiger Stadium in 1961 by owner John Fetzer.
  • In 1938, Cherry Street, which had been the northern border of the stadium, was vacated allowing the stadium to expand to a capacity of 52,416, and it was officially renamed Briggs Stadium. This was the last major expansion of the stadium.
  • The Farrow Group and MCM Management Corporation began demolition of the stadium on June 30, 2008.

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More Information

Location

2121 Trumbull Street
1500-1598 Michigan Avenue, 2200-2298 Cochrane Street
2121 Trumbull Street
48216
Downtown
Detroit
Michigan
U.S.A.

Technical Data

150.00 ft
1912
1938
2009
$300,000

Involved Companies


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