ok We use cookies on our website to allow you the best possible service. More information can be found here.
Your location:

Michigan State Capitol

View all 9 images Download as PDF Purchase Images

Identification

Michigan State Capitol
Michigan Capitol Building
128293

Map

Structure in General

monumental hall
existing [completed]
masonry
brick
cast iron
limestone
sandstone
applied masonry
renaissance revival

Usages

capitol (national subdivision)

Facts

  • The Michigan State Capitol was designed in a late Classic Renaissance style.
  • Cruciform in plan, the brick-walled masonry is primarily faced with Ohio sandstone, with the foundation, basecourse and outside steps made of Illinois limestone. The building is capped by a painted cast and sheet iron dome.
  • The rotunda beneath the dome is 150 feet high and flanked by two grand stairways leading from the basement to the fourth floor.
  • A restoration from 1987 to1992 returned the entire building to its original appearance.
  • This is the second capitol building in Lansing, and the third in Michigan. The original capitol building stood in Detroit.
  • The building sits on 1.16 acres of land in the center of downtown Lansing on a small hill.
  • The glass floor in the rotunda is made of 976 blocks of glass. The higher into the dome you get, the floor appears to fall in an optical illusion creating an upside down dome effect.
  • The capitol's thin dome has only four small floors. And the rotunda inside is only 44' in diameter at its widest point.
  • This building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.

Do you need more information about this building and its related companies?

More Information

Location

100 South Capitol Avenue
100 South Capitol Avenue
48933
Capitol Complex
Ward 4
Lansing
Michigan
U.S.A.

Technical Data

267.00 ft
267.00 ft
420.18 ft
273.92 ft
4
1
1872
1878
1992
$1,427,743

Involved Companies

Elijah E. Myers


Show now
Show now
Show now
Show now

1992


Show now
Show now

Features & Amenities

  • National landmark
Found a mistake?
Related Buildings