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Littlefield Building

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Identification

Littlefield Building
123157

Map

Structure in General

high-rise building
existing [completed]
steel
brick
light brown
beaux-arts / historism

Usages

commercial office
residential condominium shop(s) restaurant

Facts

  • Tallest commercial office building in Austin for 19 years from 1910 to 1929 when the Norwood Tower was built.
  • The Littlefield Building has residential spaces on the top 2 floors with office and retail space on the lower floors. The residential part is known as the "Littlefield Quarters".
  • Because of the quality of the steel and quality of the construction of the building it could stand the weight of having four new floors added.
  • 2,164,488 pounds of steel were used in the building's construction, along with 113,315 pounds of cast iron. 1.3 million bricks were used from local manufacturers, along with 250,000 more bricks that make up the building's facade.
  • The building had its grand opening ceremony on June 6, 1912.
  • Former President Lyndon Baines Johnson was a tenant in the building in 1935 while he was working with the National Youth Administration.
  • Air conditioning was installed in the building for the first time in 1957.
  • The Littlefield Building competed with the Scarbrough Building located across Congress Avenue for title of tallest in the city. The Littlefield Building added 1 more floor to its design and beat the Scarbrough Building winning the tallest title.

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More Information

Location

601 Congress Avenue
106 East 6th Street
106 East Sixth Street
78701
Financial District
Downtown
Austin
Texas
U.S.A.

Technical Data

148.00 ft
139.00 ft
14.00 ft
160.00 ft
69.00 ft
9
1
1910
1912

Involved Companies



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Features & Amenities

  • One of the city's famous buildings
  • City landmark
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