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New York Times Building

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Identification

New York Times Building
Pace University Building, 39-43 Park Row 147-151 Nassau Street
113778

Map

Structure in General

high-rise building
existing [completed]
steel
romanesque revival

Usages

commercial office

Facts

  • The former Times Building is the sole remaining office building in the downtown area by the pioneering skyscraper designer George B. Post.
  • This sixteen-story office building, constructed as the home of the New York Times, is one of the last survivors of Newspaper Row, the center of newspaper publishing in New York City from the 1830s to the 1920s.
  • Erected in 1888-89 and enlarged in 1903-05, the present building was the paper's second on the site.
  • Post, the country's pre-eminent architect-engineer, achieved a major technological feat with this commission which required him to incorporate the floor framing from the Times's five-story 1857 building so newspaper operations could continue on site while the new building was under construction.
  • The carefully-scaled details include compound colonnettes, roll moldings, miniature balustrades, foliate reliefs, gargoyles and a mansard with gabled dormers.
  • In 1904, the Times, which had been sold to Adolph Ochs, relocated to Times Square. The former ground-floor offices of the Times were converted to retail use, the mansard was taken down, and four new stories were added to the designs of Robert Maynicke.
  • With its three highly visible facades on Park Row, Nassau Street, and Spruce Street facing Printing House Square, the former New York Times Building remains a prominent presence in New York's civic center.
  • Pace University acquired the building in 1951 for part of its Manhattan campus, converting the offices to classrooms and making changes to the base.
  • The Times Building, Post's first in the Richardsonian Romanesque idiom, was considered "a masterpiece of the Romanesque style."
  • Faced with rusticated Indiana limestone blocks above a gray Maine granite base, the facades are articulated in a complex composition featuring a series of impressive arcades that emphasize the verticality of the building and horizontal moldings that call attention to the underlying structure.

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More Information

Location

40-43 Park Row
40 Park Row, 39 Park Row
41 Park Row
10038
Financial District
Manhattan
New York City
New York
U.S.A.

Technical Data

212.00 ft
212.00 ft
212.00 ft
16
1888
1889
1905
4

Involved Companies


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Features & Amenities

  • City landmark
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